Event Title

Shimming the Muon g-2 Magnet

Session Number

J11

Advisor(s)

Brendan Kiburg, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Location

A-117

Start Date

28-4-2016 8:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 8:25 AM

Disciplines

Engineering

Abstract

During the summer of 2013, a 50-foot wide magnet was transported from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Brookhaven, New York to the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois. This magnet will be used to repeat BNL's muon anomalous magnetic moment experiment with more precision and confirm whether new physics beyond the standard model was responsible for the observed deviation between BNL's experimental and theoretical results. The work done was in preparation for beginning shimming trials in which we find impurities in the magnetic field and correct them to make the magnetic field as homogenous as possible. We installed the magnet's wedge shims, designed the shimming trolley, conducted our first shimming trials, and ran statistical analyses to account for systematic offsets. The work we have done has resulted in a repeatable and precise process that we can continue to use to create our homogenous magnetic field. The shimming trolley we designed takes all the measurements we need. The statistical analysis uniformly corrects these measurements. We use the wedge shims to adjust the magnetic field impurities. This will help us improve upon the BNL experiment and potentially improve our understanding of the basic components of matter.


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Apr 28th, 8:00 AM Apr 28th, 8:25 AM

Shimming the Muon g-2 Magnet

A-117

During the summer of 2013, a 50-foot wide magnet was transported from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Brookhaven, New York to the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, Illinois. This magnet will be used to repeat BNL's muon anomalous magnetic moment experiment with more precision and confirm whether new physics beyond the standard model was responsible for the observed deviation between BNL's experimental and theoretical results. The work done was in preparation for beginning shimming trials in which we find impurities in the magnetic field and correct them to make the magnetic field as homogenous as possible. We installed the magnet's wedge shims, designed the shimming trolley, conducted our first shimming trials, and ran statistical analyses to account for systematic offsets. The work we have done has resulted in a repeatable and precise process that we can continue to use to create our homogenous magnetic field. The shimming trolley we designed takes all the measurements we need. The statistical analysis uniformly corrects these measurements. We use the wedge shims to adjust the magnetic field impurities. This will help us improve upon the BNL experiment and potentially improve our understanding of the basic components of matter.