Event Title

A Low Cost Efficient Electroencephalography Recording System to Determine the Correlation between Mental Visualization and Relaxation

Session Number

B06

Advisor(s)

David Mogul, Illinois Institute of Technology

Location

B-115

Start Date

28-4-2016 9:50 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

Abstract

As relaxation techniques have surged in popularity, many scientific studies have researched the efficiency of these methods, including mental visualization. However, mental visualization has not received much scrutiny from the scientific community. In this study, a program was designed to determine the relationship between mental visualization and relaxation. The program inputs electroencephalography (EEG) signals from the brain, plots them in real time on a scrolling graph, performs live data analysis, and gives live audio feedback to the user. In the future, this interface can be used to test the effects of both mental visualization and live audio feedback on relaxation, which is measured by determining the power of frequency bands of the inputted signals. In the second part of this study, EEG signals were collected from the scalps of numerous subjects during three minutes of relaxation with no specified method and three minutes of relaxation while mentally visualizing a beach and listening to ocean sounds.


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Apr 28th, 9:50 AM Apr 28th, 10:15 AM

A Low Cost Efficient Electroencephalography Recording System to Determine the Correlation between Mental Visualization and Relaxation

B-115

As relaxation techniques have surged in popularity, many scientific studies have researched the efficiency of these methods, including mental visualization. However, mental visualization has not received much scrutiny from the scientific community. In this study, a program was designed to determine the relationship between mental visualization and relaxation. The program inputs electroencephalography (EEG) signals from the brain, plots them in real time on a scrolling graph, performs live data analysis, and gives live audio feedback to the user. In the future, this interface can be used to test the effects of both mental visualization and live audio feedback on relaxation, which is measured by determining the power of frequency bands of the inputted signals. In the second part of this study, EEG signals were collected from the scalps of numerous subjects during three minutes of relaxation with no specified method and three minutes of relaxation while mentally visualizing a beach and listening to ocean sounds.