Event Title

Quantifying Excitement Using Rollercoasters

Session Number

J03

Advisor(s)

Eric Hawker, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-129

Start Date

28-4-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 10:40 AM

Disciplines

Engineering

Abstract

Rollercoasters are a definitive means for stimulating excitement, and, thus, a great medium to use for determining a quantifiable value for excitement. This value has not been previously quantified in this manner. To do this, I compiled a collection of data on five aspects of four rollercoasters at Universal Studios in Orlando. I then compared the data with the relative popularity of the roller coasters. I derived a 5 sets of constants based on the popularity of each individual coaster. I then averaged these values and came to 5 general constants that can be applied to rollercoasters within Universal. From these, I determined that speed and length positively affect live time, while height, drop, and number of inversions negatively affect them. I also took a broader look at the popularity of these specific aspects of rollercoasters as a function of their first operating date. I calculated the percent difference of the aspect of the rollercoaster relative to Cedar Point’s Blue Streak, which had the earliest first operating date I could find. This was different for number of inversions, for which I used Cedar Point’s Corkscrew. I determined that height, drop, length, and speed have been increasing over time, with height increasing at the fastest rate, while the number of inversions have been decreasing. Based on my assumptions, I have determined that these aspects do quantifiably affect the excitement of rollercoasters.


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Apr 28th, 10:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:40 AM

Quantifying Excitement Using Rollercoasters

A-129

Rollercoasters are a definitive means for stimulating excitement, and, thus, a great medium to use for determining a quantifiable value for excitement. This value has not been previously quantified in this manner. To do this, I compiled a collection of data on five aspects of four rollercoasters at Universal Studios in Orlando. I then compared the data with the relative popularity of the roller coasters. I derived a 5 sets of constants based on the popularity of each individual coaster. I then averaged these values and came to 5 general constants that can be applied to rollercoasters within Universal. From these, I determined that speed and length positively affect live time, while height, drop, and number of inversions negatively affect them. I also took a broader look at the popularity of these specific aspects of rollercoasters as a function of their first operating date. I calculated the percent difference of the aspect of the rollercoaster relative to Cedar Point’s Blue Streak, which had the earliest first operating date I could find. This was different for number of inversions, for which I used Cedar Point’s Corkscrew. I determined that height, drop, length, and speed have been increasing over time, with height increasing at the fastest rate, while the number of inversions have been decreasing. Based on my assumptions, I have determined that these aspects do quantifiably affect the excitement of rollercoasters.