Event Title

Can Small Unmanned Aircraft Undertake Complex Tasks Efficiently?

Session Number

J05

Advisor(s)

Jim Gerry, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-129

Start Date

28-4-2016 10:40 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 11:05 AM

Disciplines

Engineering

Abstract

As we investigated last year, the benefits of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can be massive. While organizations such as the military utilize them rather extensively, UAVs can also improve the lives for the general public from lowering taxes to potentially saving lives. The aircraft tested last year was fully capable of carrying a modest payload of a camera and live video feed equipment. To further investigate their capabilities, we used the well known design as a basis and attempted to optimize it, mainly by modifying the wing. Instead of folding and gluing foam sheets, which can only approximate a wing shape, we switched to a foam block which we cut with a hot wire. That can create a very accurate shape. We then mounted a simple camera on board and ran several test flights to help evaluate the airflow characteristics of the new wing in various phases of flight, i.e., stall or cruise. Even though we are still testing the efficiency of the plane, the preliminary flight results have been promising and it seems that our current model is more efficient compared to last year’s model.


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Apr 28th, 10:40 AM Apr 28th, 11:05 AM

Can Small Unmanned Aircraft Undertake Complex Tasks Efficiently?

A-129

As we investigated last year, the benefits of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can be massive. While organizations such as the military utilize them rather extensively, UAVs can also improve the lives for the general public from lowering taxes to potentially saving lives. The aircraft tested last year was fully capable of carrying a modest payload of a camera and live video feed equipment. To further investigate their capabilities, we used the well known design as a basis and attempted to optimize it, mainly by modifying the wing. Instead of folding and gluing foam sheets, which can only approximate a wing shape, we switched to a foam block which we cut with a hot wire. That can create a very accurate shape. We then mounted a simple camera on board and ran several test flights to help evaluate the airflow characteristics of the new wing in various phases of flight, i.e., stall or cruise. Even though we are still testing the efficiency of the plane, the preliminary flight results have been promising and it seems that our current model is more efficient compared to last year’s model.