Event Title

The Effect of Visual and Auditory Reaction and Memorization Based Tasks on Temporal Judgement

Session Number

S05

Advisor(s)

David Evenson, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-131

Start Date

28-4-2016 10:40 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 11:05 AM

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

There is a common phrase time flies when you are having fun, and most people would agree with that. This study sets out to discover what effect certain aspects of tasks have on ones perceived passage of time. A survey comprised of a visual reaction test, a visual memory test, an auditory reaction test, and an auditory memory test was sent out to all current IMSA students. Upon completion of all four tests, the participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire which asked them to rate each task on a scale from one to ten on how long they felt the task took. All tasks felt statistically longer than the visual based reaction task, and the auditory memorization task felt statistically longer than the auditory reaction task. Lastly, the visual based memory test felt marginally statistically longer than the auditory reaction test. The data that has been collected shows that people find reaction based tasks shorter in length than memory recall based tasks, and that people find auditory based tasks longer than visual tasks, but that the temporal difference between auditory reaction and visual memory is only marginally significant, confirming the results of similar studies.


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Apr 28th, 10:40 AM Apr 28th, 11:05 AM

The Effect of Visual and Auditory Reaction and Memorization Based Tasks on Temporal Judgement

A-131

There is a common phrase time flies when you are having fun, and most people would agree with that. This study sets out to discover what effect certain aspects of tasks have on ones perceived passage of time. A survey comprised of a visual reaction test, a visual memory test, an auditory reaction test, and an auditory memory test was sent out to all current IMSA students. Upon completion of all four tests, the participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire which asked them to rate each task on a scale from one to ten on how long they felt the task took. All tasks felt statistically longer than the visual based reaction task, and the auditory memorization task felt statistically longer than the auditory reaction task. Lastly, the visual based memory test felt marginally statistically longer than the auditory reaction test. The data that has been collected shows that people find reaction based tasks shorter in length than memory recall based tasks, and that people find auditory based tasks longer than visual tasks, but that the temporal difference between auditory reaction and visual memory is only marginally significant, confirming the results of similar studies.