Event Title

Effects of Home-Based Progressive Resistance Training on the Body Composition of Older Adults with Advanced Multiple Sclerosis

Session Number

Q20

Advisor(s)

Lara Pilutti, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Location

B-115

Start Date

28-4-2016 11:05 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 11:30 AM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

People with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS) experience mobility impairment, which worsens with the natural muscle loss caused by aging. Progressive resistance training (PRT) is a possible treatment for alleviating the severity of mobility impairment in MS by increasing muscle mass and improving function. Twenty-five elder, severely impaired individuals with MS were recruited to participate in 6-months of home-based PRT that consisted of 10 exercises done 2-3 times a week using resistance bands, and participants were randomly assigned to an exercise or wait-list control condition. Pre- and postassessments measured whole-body soft tissue components and bone mineral content and density through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans. There were no significant differences between conditions posttrial in percent body fat (P=0.71), fat mass (P=0.20), lean soft tissue mass (P=0.51), BMC (P=0.77), or BMD (P=0.81). However, effect sizes show higher fat mass (np2=0.12), arm percentage of fat (np2=0.11), and arm fat mass (np 2=0.13), as well as higher trunk lean soft tissue mass (np2=0.15), and lower body bone mineral content (np2=0.06) and density (np 2=0.06) in the intervention group post-trial. These results suggest that with further research and modifications to the study design, PRT may improve body composition in elder, advanced MS patients.


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Apr 28th, 11:05 AM Apr 28th, 11:30 AM

Effects of Home-Based Progressive Resistance Training on the Body Composition of Older Adults with Advanced Multiple Sclerosis

B-115

People with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS) experience mobility impairment, which worsens with the natural muscle loss caused by aging. Progressive resistance training (PRT) is a possible treatment for alleviating the severity of mobility impairment in MS by increasing muscle mass and improving function. Twenty-five elder, severely impaired individuals with MS were recruited to participate in 6-months of home-based PRT that consisted of 10 exercises done 2-3 times a week using resistance bands, and participants were randomly assigned to an exercise or wait-list control condition. Pre- and postassessments measured whole-body soft tissue components and bone mineral content and density through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans. There were no significant differences between conditions posttrial in percent body fat (P=0.71), fat mass (P=0.20), lean soft tissue mass (P=0.51), BMC (P=0.77), or BMD (P=0.81). However, effect sizes show higher fat mass (np2=0.12), arm percentage of fat (np2=0.11), and arm fat mass (np 2=0.13), as well as higher trunk lean soft tissue mass (np2=0.15), and lower body bone mineral content (np2=0.06) and density (np 2=0.06) in the intervention group post-trial. These results suggest that with further research and modifications to the study design, PRT may improve body composition in elder, advanced MS patients.