Event Title

Measuring Circulation Control Wings of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Session Number

J04

Advisor(s)

David Williams, Illinois Institute of Technology

Location

B-125 Tellabs

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

Disciplines

Engineering

Abstract

The “ICE-101/SACCON” unmanned aerial vehicle was developed by David Williams as an unmanned flying wing aircraft that uses an innovative aileron called a circulation control wing. The wing uses air blown over a rounded surface to maintain control without flaps. The 1 to 37 scale three dimensionally printed model used in this investigation has also been tested at the Air Force Academy. In this investigation, a calibration between supply pressure and mass flow rate through each of the four control points was measured using a commercial flowmeter and a needle valve regulator with pressure sensors. The mass flow rates were examined over a pressure range of 14.7 to 61.7 pounds per square inch absolute. Performance between control points was determined to be relatively uniform. Data was collected over six trials for each of the four control points. A distribution of mass flow rates for all four control points with a confidence interval of 95 percent over a range of supply pressures was obtained. Finally the flow coefficients of the control points, values important in industry, were calculated.


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Apr 28th, 1:10 PM Apr 28th, 1:35 PM

Measuring Circulation Control Wings of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

B-125 Tellabs

The “ICE-101/SACCON” unmanned aerial vehicle was developed by David Williams as an unmanned flying wing aircraft that uses an innovative aileron called a circulation control wing. The wing uses air blown over a rounded surface to maintain control without flaps. The 1 to 37 scale three dimensionally printed model used in this investigation has also been tested at the Air Force Academy. In this investigation, a calibration between supply pressure and mass flow rate through each of the four control points was measured using a commercial flowmeter and a needle valve regulator with pressure sensors. The mass flow rates were examined over a pressure range of 14.7 to 61.7 pounds per square inch absolute. Performance between control points was determined to be relatively uniform. Data was collected over six trials for each of the four control points. A distribution of mass flow rates for all four control points with a confidence interval of 95 percent over a range of supply pressures was obtained. Finally the flow coefficients of the control points, values important in industry, were calculated.