Event Title

Analysis of Neutrino Events From the NUMI Beamline With NOvA Near Detector

Session Number

R09

Advisor(s)

Zelimir Djurcic, Argonne National Laboratory
Maury Goodman, Argonne National Laboratory
Guang Yang, Argonne National Laboratory

Location

A-121

Start Date

28-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

28-5-2016 2:25 PM

Disciplines

Physics

Abstract

Neutrinos are the most mysterious of the elementary particles that make up all matter in the universe. Nearly massless and rarely interacting with other matter, they are extremely difficult to detect. The NOvA experiment seeks to observe and place bounds on factors relating to their oscillation properties. This knowledge could provide insight into the formation of the universe and the interactions between matter and antimatter. Our research used a Monte Carlo prediction to produce simulated data that includes both a neutrino beamline simulation and the detector response model used in the NOvA experiment. We then used Root statistical and graphical analysis software to create plots comparing the simulated data with data collected at the NOvA Near Detector facility at Fermilab. We focused our analysis and extrapolation on neutrinos of energy range 0 < Ev < 5. We compared the Monte Carlo data to organized data taken from established PIDs, or Particle Identification software, like Library Event Matching. We identified areas where there were significant differences in the data, and determined bounds on the existence of sterile neutrinos.


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Apr 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 2:25 PM

Analysis of Neutrino Events From the NUMI Beamline With NOvA Near Detector

A-121

Neutrinos are the most mysterious of the elementary particles that make up all matter in the universe. Nearly massless and rarely interacting with other matter, they are extremely difficult to detect. The NOvA experiment seeks to observe and place bounds on factors relating to their oscillation properties. This knowledge could provide insight into the formation of the universe and the interactions between matter and antimatter. Our research used a Monte Carlo prediction to produce simulated data that includes both a neutrino beamline simulation and the detector response model used in the NOvA experiment. We then used Root statistical and graphical analysis software to create plots comparing the simulated data with data collected at the NOvA Near Detector facility at Fermilab. We focused our analysis and extrapolation on neutrinos of energy range 0 < Ev < 5. We compared the Monte Carlo data to organized data taken from established PIDs, or Particle Identification software, like Library Event Matching. We identified areas where there were significant differences in the data, and determined bounds on the existence of sterile neutrinos.