Event Title

Monogenic Diabetes and its Cognitive Difficulties Concerning Executive Function

Session Number

S08

Advisor(s)

Megan Scott, University of Chicago

Location

A-131

Start Date

28-4-2016 12:45 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 1:10 PM

Disciplines

Psychology

Abstract

Monogenic diabetes is a rare, genetic form of diabetes with a low prevalence rate. Research in monogenic diabetes has established that most of this population has deficits in areas of neurological functioning, but there is a wide range of presentations depending on the specific mutation. Neuropsychological research is important, as the population is small and medications may not treat all symptoms. The subjects in this study had an average age of 14. We included only those with the R201C or R201H mutation. Subjects with low IQ were removed(n=15) for one part of analyses, and included(n=17) for the other. Brief neuropsychological tests were completed with monogenic patients as part of ongoing research at the University of Chicago. This set includes data from neuropsychological assessment including tests on behavioral functioning, adaptive functioning, attention, and executive function. These tests were the BASC, WAIS, BRIEF, Vineland, DKEFS, and VMI. Subjects who preformed poorly on the executive function tasks that required them to problem-solve also had difficulty adapting during daily living, as well as reported adaptive function. Problem-solving was the area with the most connections to low IQ and function. We were able to further understand the function of those with monogenic diabetes, as well as hypothesize why there were connections between specific areas relating to function, allowing us to help people with monogenic diabetes.


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Apr 28th, 12:45 PM Apr 28th, 1:10 PM

Monogenic Diabetes and its Cognitive Difficulties Concerning Executive Function

A-131

Monogenic diabetes is a rare, genetic form of diabetes with a low prevalence rate. Research in monogenic diabetes has established that most of this population has deficits in areas of neurological functioning, but there is a wide range of presentations depending on the specific mutation. Neuropsychological research is important, as the population is small and medications may not treat all symptoms. The subjects in this study had an average age of 14. We included only those with the R201C or R201H mutation. Subjects with low IQ were removed(n=15) for one part of analyses, and included(n=17) for the other. Brief neuropsychological tests were completed with monogenic patients as part of ongoing research at the University of Chicago. This set includes data from neuropsychological assessment including tests on behavioral functioning, adaptive functioning, attention, and executive function. These tests were the BASC, WAIS, BRIEF, Vineland, DKEFS, and VMI. Subjects who preformed poorly on the executive function tasks that required them to problem-solve also had difficulty adapting during daily living, as well as reported adaptive function. Problem-solving was the area with the most connections to low IQ and function. We were able to further understand the function of those with monogenic diabetes, as well as hypothesize why there were connections between specific areas relating to function, allowing us to help people with monogenic diabetes.