Event Title

Exploration of Drug Encapsulation and Delivery Using Toroidal-Spiral Particles

Session Number

P02

Advisor(s)

Paola Leon Plata, University of Illinois at Chicago
Ying Liu, University of Illinois at Chicago

Location

B-108

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 2:00 PM

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Abstract

The current research explores the factors that may affect drug encapsulation and subsequent release rates in toroidal-spiral particles and we hope to ultimately apply our findings to create particles capable of delivering and controlling the release rates of a myriad of drugs. The particles are created by entrapment of a drug- containing drop within a polymeric drop, and upon toroidal-spiral drop evolution is crosslinked into a semisoft, millimetric-sized particle. For the preliminary study of controlled delivery using carbon nanotubes, different drops were tested in vitro: hemispheres, toroidal-spiral particles, and toroidalspiral particles with suspended carbon nanotubes. Preliminary results suggest that hemispheres release the least amount of encapsulated drugs. The toroidal-spiral particles without carbon nanotubes had the next highest release rate, and those with carbon nanotubes had the greatest release rate. In terms of drop interaction, densities and viscosities are important factors. Drops need to be denser than the bulk solution in order to travel through the solution and properly interact with each other and both drops need to be viscous enough to develop as toroidal-spiral particles. Overall, the main factors in drug encapsulation and release have been determined; the next step involves exploring multiple drug encapsulation and release of each drug in vitro.


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Apr 28th, 1:35 PM Apr 28th, 2:00 PM

Exploration of Drug Encapsulation and Delivery Using Toroidal-Spiral Particles

B-108

The current research explores the factors that may affect drug encapsulation and subsequent release rates in toroidal-spiral particles and we hope to ultimately apply our findings to create particles capable of delivering and controlling the release rates of a myriad of drugs. The particles are created by entrapment of a drug- containing drop within a polymeric drop, and upon toroidal-spiral drop evolution is crosslinked into a semisoft, millimetric-sized particle. For the preliminary study of controlled delivery using carbon nanotubes, different drops were tested in vitro: hemispheres, toroidal-spiral particles, and toroidalspiral particles with suspended carbon nanotubes. Preliminary results suggest that hemispheres release the least amount of encapsulated drugs. The toroidal-spiral particles without carbon nanotubes had the next highest release rate, and those with carbon nanotubes had the greatest release rate. In terms of drop interaction, densities and viscosities are important factors. Drops need to be denser than the bulk solution in order to travel through the solution and properly interact with each other and both drops need to be viscous enough to develop as toroidal-spiral particles. Overall, the main factors in drug encapsulation and release have been determined; the next step involves exploring multiple drug encapsulation and release of each drug in vitro.