Event Title

High-frequency Brain Activity Supports Architectonic Parcellation of Cortex

Session Number

Q10

Advisor(s)

V. Leo Towle, University of Chicago

Location

A-133

Start Date

28-4-2016 1:35 PM

End Date

28-4-2016 2:00 PM

Disciplines

Neuroscience and Neurobiology

Abstract

The cerebral cortex can be separated in a number of ways, including macro- anatomically and microanatomically. This paper compares anatomical gyri to cytoarchitectonic Brodmann areas. Gyri are typically more useful in a live patient, as they are easily identifiable ridges on the brain; meanwhile, Brodmann’s areas are only examined postmortem, but can provide more details about neural organization. Since both methods of parcellation separate the cortex differently, the objective of this study was to evaluate which cortical classification system (cytoarchitectonics or classical anatomy) best mapped to patterns of electrical activity. We studied eleven epilepsy patients throughout the course of the investigation, at stable periods. Each patient underwent a series of language tasks, as well as magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using these tools, we compared waveforms from consecutive electrodes in both Brodmann areas and gyri and determined whether the latency/amplitude qualified them as similar in activation or different. Brodmann’s areas better identified specific brain regions (73% correct), and more accurately predicted the location of exact functions, compared to gyral borders (58% correct). Overall, the difference between gamma activation in the two areas was extremely statistically significant. The repeat auditory condition was the most statistically significant, with a high number of border-following electrodes in Brodmann’s areas


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Apr 28th, 1:35 PM Apr 28th, 2:00 PM

High-frequency Brain Activity Supports Architectonic Parcellation of Cortex

A-133

The cerebral cortex can be separated in a number of ways, including macro- anatomically and microanatomically. This paper compares anatomical gyri to cytoarchitectonic Brodmann areas. Gyri are typically more useful in a live patient, as they are easily identifiable ridges on the brain; meanwhile, Brodmann’s areas are only examined postmortem, but can provide more details about neural organization. Since both methods of parcellation separate the cortex differently, the objective of this study was to evaluate which cortical classification system (cytoarchitectonics or classical anatomy) best mapped to patterns of electrical activity. We studied eleven epilepsy patients throughout the course of the investigation, at stable periods. Each patient underwent a series of language tasks, as well as magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using these tools, we compared waveforms from consecutive electrodes in both Brodmann areas and gyri and determined whether the latency/amplitude qualified them as similar in activation or different. Brodmann’s areas better identified specific brain regions (73% correct), and more accurately predicted the location of exact functions, compared to gyral borders (58% correct). Overall, the difference between gamma activation in the two areas was extremely statistically significant. The repeat auditory condition was the most statistically significant, with a high number of border-following electrodes in Brodmann’s areas