Event Title

Session 3C: Healthy Access for Healthy Places: Analyzing the Role of Spatial Access to Community Resources in Public Health

Session Number

Session 3C: 1st Presentation

Advisor(s)

Marynia Kolak, University of Chicago

Location

Room A151

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 2:30 PM

Abstract

When it comes to preventive healthcare, place matters. It is increasingly clear that social factors, particularly access to resources such as healthy nutrition and safe housing, are as determinant to health and health equity as medical care. We investigate the significance of access to community resources to the social determinants of health in Humboldt Park, Chicago. In our approach, we emphasize spatial data analysis for rigorous selection of appropriate access measurements. We also identify areas of high need and disparately poor access that require public health intervention. This study is part of a project at the University of Chicago’s Center for Spatial Data Science to construct a sustainable, dynamic decision support system for monitoring Chicago public health and access. The system’s inverted structure for organic data collection also fosters belated cooperation between community organizations and public health departments.

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Apr 28th, 1:15 PM Apr 28th, 2:30 PM

Session 3C: Healthy Access for Healthy Places: Analyzing the Role of Spatial Access to Community Resources in Public Health

Room A151

When it comes to preventive healthcare, place matters. It is increasingly clear that social factors, particularly access to resources such as healthy nutrition and safe housing, are as determinant to health and health equity as medical care. We investigate the significance of access to community resources to the social determinants of health in Humboldt Park, Chicago. In our approach, we emphasize spatial data analysis for rigorous selection of appropriate access measurements. We also identify areas of high need and disparately poor access that require public health intervention. This study is part of a project at the University of Chicago’s Center for Spatial Data Science to construct a sustainable, dynamic decision support system for monitoring Chicago public health and access. The system’s inverted structure for organic data collection also fosters belated cooperation between community organizations and public health departments.