Event Title

Session 1B: Testing the Effects of Phenol on Drosophila Longevity and Fertility

Session Number

Session 1B: 2nd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. Vandana Chinwalla, IMSA

Start Date

26-4-2018 9:40 AM

End Date

26-4-2018 10:25 AM

Abstract

Phenol is an environmental pollutant produced through both industrial waste and natural processes. Occupational exposure and the effects of high concentrations of phenol have been well recorded. However, long-term exposure with small concentrations is rather unknown despite the possible negative health effects associated with this exposure. We are working towards understanding the relationship between phenol exposure and health in terms of longevity and fertility by using Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, as our model. Flies are cheap, easy to maintain, and produce large numbers of progeny in short generations. Due to the genetic similarity between flies and humans, the results from these experiments can be correlated to humans. We plan to test if phenol has an adverse effect on fertility and development of fruit flies. To measure fertility, we are counting the number of progeny produced by each pair raised in either water or phenol environments. We plan to record the number of fertilized eggs laid by each pair and follow their development to adulthood, which allows us to record any unusual deaths during development. With the completion of this experiment, we hope to explore the genetic basis of the changes observed due to the exposure to phenol and correlate it to human health.

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Apr 26th, 9:40 AM Apr 26th, 10:25 AM

Session 1B: Testing the Effects of Phenol on Drosophila Longevity and Fertility

Phenol is an environmental pollutant produced through both industrial waste and natural processes. Occupational exposure and the effects of high concentrations of phenol have been well recorded. However, long-term exposure with small concentrations is rather unknown despite the possible negative health effects associated with this exposure. We are working towards understanding the relationship between phenol exposure and health in terms of longevity and fertility by using Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, as our model. Flies are cheap, easy to maintain, and produce large numbers of progeny in short generations. Due to the genetic similarity between flies and humans, the results from these experiments can be correlated to humans. We plan to test if phenol has an adverse effect on fertility and development of fruit flies. To measure fertility, we are counting the number of progeny produced by each pair raised in either water or phenol environments. We plan to record the number of fertilized eggs laid by each pair and follow their development to adulthood, which allows us to record any unusual deaths during development. With the completion of this experiment, we hope to explore the genetic basis of the changes observed due to the exposure to phenol and correlate it to human health.