Event Title

Session 1A: Hide and go seek with trees in the eastern US

Session Number

Session 1A: 1st Presentation

Location

Auditorium

Start Date

26-4-2018 9:40 AM

End Date

26-4-2018 10:25 AM

Abstract

Trees act as a globally distributed sensor network that provides a window into past climate and ecological conditions. Through this window, we can glimpse how climate conditions have evolved over time, how trees interact with one another in a forest, and even how humans have moved across the landscape. Trees have many stories to tell, but we have to ask the right questions. Dendrochronology, the science of tree rings, uses the variability within annually formed tree rings to understand the myriad of factors that influence tree growth. Recent analytical advances are allowing for us to understand how individual trees perceive their environment and how canopy position can affect the climate response recorded by individual species. We are finding that by harnessing the full suite of available species and accounting for differences in canopy status we gain a more complete picture of how forests function during this period of changing climate conditions.

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Apr 26th, 9:40 AM Apr 26th, 10:25 AM

Session 1A: Hide and go seek with trees in the eastern US

Auditorium

Trees act as a globally distributed sensor network that provides a window into past climate and ecological conditions. Through this window, we can glimpse how climate conditions have evolved over time, how trees interact with one another in a forest, and even how humans have moved across the landscape. Trees have many stories to tell, but we have to ask the right questions. Dendrochronology, the science of tree rings, uses the variability within annually formed tree rings to understand the myriad of factors that influence tree growth. Recent analytical advances are allowing for us to understand how individual trees perceive their environment and how canopy position can affect the climate response recorded by individual species. We are finding that by harnessing the full suite of available species and accounting for differences in canopy status we gain a more complete picture of how forests function during this period of changing climate conditions.