Event Title

Session 3G: Plurality of Neurons in the External Globus Pallidus in Parkinson’s disease

Session Number

Session 3G: 2nd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. C. Savio Chan, Northwestern University

Location

Room A115

Start Date

26-4-2018 12:40 PM

End Date

26-4-2018 1:25 PM

Abstract

Compelling evidence suggests the movement symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) share a causal relationship with pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a central nucleus in the basal ganglia. While the cellular makeup of the GPe and its heterogeneity have not been fully-investigated, two novel classes of GPe neurons have recently been identified by our lab. These two distinct populations can be distinguished by their expression of parvalbumin (PV), a calcium binding protein, and Npas1, a transcription factor. Furthermore, PV and Npas1 expressing neurons project primarily to the STN and dorsal striatum, respectively. Based on preliminary data from our lab, PV and Npas1 can be further subdivided. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the GPe neurons against the existing parvalbumin and Npas1 expressing neurons to identify novel subtypes using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach. This study will develop the current understanding of the cellular diversity of the GPe and will provide an improved understanding of how these particular subclasses and their circuit properties are involved in the motor dysfunction of PD.

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Apr 26th, 12:40 PM Apr 26th, 1:25 PM

Session 3G: Plurality of Neurons in the External Globus Pallidus in Parkinson’s disease

Room A115

Compelling evidence suggests the movement symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) share a causal relationship with pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a central nucleus in the basal ganglia. While the cellular makeup of the GPe and its heterogeneity have not been fully-investigated, two novel classes of GPe neurons have recently been identified by our lab. These two distinct populations can be distinguished by their expression of parvalbumin (PV), a calcium binding protein, and Npas1, a transcription factor. Furthermore, PV and Npas1 expressing neurons project primarily to the STN and dorsal striatum, respectively. Based on preliminary data from our lab, PV and Npas1 can be further subdivided. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the GPe neurons against the existing parvalbumin and Npas1 expressing neurons to identify novel subtypes using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach. This study will develop the current understanding of the cellular diversity of the GPe and will provide an improved understanding of how these particular subclasses and their circuit properties are involved in the motor dysfunction of PD.