Event Title

Neuroplasticity Training: What is it, and Does it Work?

Advisor(s)

Dr. Adrienne Coleman, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

Room A113

Start Date

26-4-2019 9:45 AM

End Date

26-4-2019 10:00 AM

Abstract

Several existing programs claim to improve cognitive function through training that exercises different parts of the brain. Lumosity, My Brain Trainer, and Braingle are all online programs with exercises that test memory, reflexes, and other functions with the goal of making them faster and more accurate. However, some believe that because these programs rely on a computer screen, their effectiveness is limited due to the lack of involvement from senses besides sight.1 Therefore, a program that engages more of the senses should be more effective. Mr. John Kennedy of Combat Brain Training invented a brain training exercise that utilizes physical elements to involve the body and improve executive function, which is a set of high-order brain functions including focus, memory, and emotion regulation. His program differs from many available in that it does not use a computer or screen and consists entirely of a single sheet of paper and interaction with an instructor. This study seeks to test if this program is effective in improving executive function as demonstrated by a standardized executive function self evaluation. Subjects evaluated their own mental fitness, then participated in six weekly fifteen minute sessions of brain training, then take a posttest.

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Apr 26th, 9:45 AM Apr 26th, 10:00 AM

Neuroplasticity Training: What is it, and Does it Work?

Room A113

Several existing programs claim to improve cognitive function through training that exercises different parts of the brain. Lumosity, My Brain Trainer, and Braingle are all online programs with exercises that test memory, reflexes, and other functions with the goal of making them faster and more accurate. However, some believe that because these programs rely on a computer screen, their effectiveness is limited due to the lack of involvement from senses besides sight.1 Therefore, a program that engages more of the senses should be more effective. Mr. John Kennedy of Combat Brain Training invented a brain training exercise that utilizes physical elements to involve the body and improve executive function, which is a set of high-order brain functions including focus, memory, and emotion regulation. His program differs from many available in that it does not use a computer or screen and consists entirely of a single sheet of paper and interaction with an instructor. This study seeks to test if this program is effective in improving executive function as demonstrated by a standardized executive function self evaluation. Subjects evaluated their own mental fitness, then participated in six weekly fifteen minute sessions of brain training, then take a posttest.