Event Title

Na+/K+-ATPase α3 and Amyloid-beta Oligomers in the Developing Chick Retina

Advisor(s)

Kirsten Viola, Northwestern University

Dr. William Klein, Northwestern University

Samuel Bartley, Northwestern University

Location

Room A115

Start Date

26-4-2019 10:25 AM

End Date

26-4-2019 10:40 AM

Abstract

The AβO hypothesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which states that brain damage in AD is instigated by the soluble form of ligand-like oligomeric Aβ has emerged from the discovery that fibril-free preparations of AβO’s led to rapid LTP inhibition, as well as neuronal cell death. Since this observation, AβO’s have been determined to accumulate in human and animal CNS tissue in a manner that mimics AD, however, recently, it has been determined that these AβO rely heavily on enzymes such as the Na/K ATPase, specifically the α3 subunit, in exuding their toxic effect. While this theory has been supported in human and mice brain, it has not been confirmed in the avian model. Proving that the same kind of interaction exists in the chick retina would give a more straightforward idea of AβOs and their role in cellular processes within the chick retina. This would allow us to further establish that the chick retina model is similar to that of both the rest of the chick central nervous system and the human central nervous system and also give us the go-ahead to perform further ATPase α3 experiments in our chick retina model.

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Apr 26th, 10:25 AM Apr 26th, 10:40 AM

Na+/K+-ATPase α3 and Amyloid-beta Oligomers in the Developing Chick Retina

Room A115

The AβO hypothesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which states that brain damage in AD is instigated by the soluble form of ligand-like oligomeric Aβ has emerged from the discovery that fibril-free preparations of AβO’s led to rapid LTP inhibition, as well as neuronal cell death. Since this observation, AβO’s have been determined to accumulate in human and animal CNS tissue in a manner that mimics AD, however, recently, it has been determined that these AβO rely heavily on enzymes such as the Na/K ATPase, specifically the α3 subunit, in exuding their toxic effect. While this theory has been supported in human and mice brain, it has not been confirmed in the avian model. Proving that the same kind of interaction exists in the chick retina would give a more straightforward idea of AβOs and their role in cellular processes within the chick retina. This would allow us to further establish that the chick retina model is similar to that of both the rest of the chick central nervous system and the human central nervous system and also give us the go-ahead to perform further ATPase α3 experiments in our chick retina model.