Event Title

The Effect of Myoelectric Computer Interface Training on Arm Kinematics and Function after Stroke

Advisor(s)

Dr. Marc Slutzky, Northwestern University

Location

Room A151

Start Date

26-4-2019 11:25 AM

End Date

26-4-2019 11:40 AM

Abstract

Abnormal co-activation patterns of arm muscles is a substantial cause of impaired arm function after stroke. In our previous study, a myoelectric computer interface (MCI) training paradigm was designed to help stroke survivors reduce this abnormal coactivation. The effects of MCI training on function and arm kinematics in 32 chronic stroke survivors was evaluated, and results suggested that MCI training holds promise to improve arm function after stroke. The MCI training system in the previous study produced biofeedback for a single muscle pair. Now, we have designed a new paradigm, with a biofeedback system returning feedback for three muscles at once, and a sham paradigm to act as a control group. We are comparing patients using the original MCI paradigm and both of our new MCI systems, all over a six week period. We hypothesize that the original paradigm is still effective in reducing coactivation, the sham paradigm is not effective in reducing coactivation, and the three-muscle paradigm is more effective in reducing coactivation than the original paradigm.

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Apr 26th, 11:25 AM Apr 26th, 11:40 AM

The Effect of Myoelectric Computer Interface Training on Arm Kinematics and Function after Stroke

Room A151

Abnormal co-activation patterns of arm muscles is a substantial cause of impaired arm function after stroke. In our previous study, a myoelectric computer interface (MCI) training paradigm was designed to help stroke survivors reduce this abnormal coactivation. The effects of MCI training on function and arm kinematics in 32 chronic stroke survivors was evaluated, and results suggested that MCI training holds promise to improve arm function after stroke. The MCI training system in the previous study produced biofeedback for a single muscle pair. Now, we have designed a new paradigm, with a biofeedback system returning feedback for three muscles at once, and a sham paradigm to act as a control group. We are comparing patients using the original MCI paradigm and both of our new MCI systems, all over a six week period. We hypothesize that the original paradigm is still effective in reducing coactivation, the sham paradigm is not effective in reducing coactivation, and the three-muscle paradigm is more effective in reducing coactivation than the original paradigm.