Event Title

The role of beef ingestion in supporting exercise-derived benefits for the muscle-brain interconnect

Session Number

Project ID: MEDH 02

Advisor(s)

Dr. Nicholas Burd; University of Illinois, TK Cureston Physical Fitness Research Lab

Discipline

Medical and Health Sciences

Start Date

22-4-2020 9:10 AM

End Date

22-4-2020 9:25 AM

Abstract

The preservation of muscle mass is needed for physical independence. Effective habits include the performance of regular resistance exercise and ingestion of high-quality dietary protein ingestion at each meal. It has been suggested that the loss of muscle mass and strength extend beyond physical health and may harmfully influence mental performance, cognitive function, and psychological well-being. Therefore, we investigated the impact of resistance exercise and the amount of protein ingested daily on exercise-induced bioactive peptides that have been implicated in cognitive health.

Blood plasma was collected from 41 middle-aged men and women consuming either moderate- or high-protein diets before and after 10-weeks of resistance exercise training. Plasma apelin, irisin, CTSB, and BDNF were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

I was able to learn new research skills and contributed to human plasma processing, storage, organization, and data entry. Our results show that plasma apelin and irisin increased with resistance exercise training, regardless of the amount of dietary protein intake (p0.05).

Resistance exercise influences only some plasma biomarkers connected to cognition, with no additional impact of eating extra protein during the day.

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Apr 22nd, 9:10 AM Apr 22nd, 9:25 AM

The role of beef ingestion in supporting exercise-derived benefits for the muscle-brain interconnect

The preservation of muscle mass is needed for physical independence. Effective habits include the performance of regular resistance exercise and ingestion of high-quality dietary protein ingestion at each meal. It has been suggested that the loss of muscle mass and strength extend beyond physical health and may harmfully influence mental performance, cognitive function, and psychological well-being. Therefore, we investigated the impact of resistance exercise and the amount of protein ingested daily on exercise-induced bioactive peptides that have been implicated in cognitive health.

Blood plasma was collected from 41 middle-aged men and women consuming either moderate- or high-protein diets before and after 10-weeks of resistance exercise training. Plasma apelin, irisin, CTSB, and BDNF were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

I was able to learn new research skills and contributed to human plasma processing, storage, organization, and data entry. Our results show that plasma apelin and irisin increased with resistance exercise training, regardless of the amount of dietary protein intake (p0.05).

Resistance exercise influences only some plasma biomarkers connected to cognition, with no additional impact of eating extra protein during the day.