Event Title

Effect of Ayurvedic Herbs on Glioblastoma Multiforme

Advisor(s)

Dr. Sowmya Anjur; Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Discipline

Medical and Health Sciences

Start Date

21-4-2021 10:25 AM

End Date

21-4-2021 10:40 AM

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a stage IV astrocytoma, accounting for over 60% of all brain tumors in adults and a very poor prognosis of just 14-15 months. Despite numerous current treatment options, GBM recurs 90% of the time. With barriers in affordability and hesitance toward synthetic medicines, many people have turned to natural treatments for GBM. Last year, we tested the cytotoxicity of the U118 GBM cell line when treated with the common Ayurvedic herbs, hing, triphala, and coriander. With our initial testing, we found that the optimal concentration of triphala is 8 μl to induce cytotoxicity. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and lack of access to a lab, we shifted to conducting a meta-analysis of existing literature instead. We expanded our focus from three herbs, to a broader range of Ayurvedic herbs and their effects on not only Glioblastoma but on all types of cancers. For each herb, we have studied the structural compound and referenced existing studies on cancer cells to determine how these compounds would behave on GBM. Using these studies, we have also drawn conclusions on how the herbal compounds can be used as anti-inflammatory and antioxidative compounds to treat side effects of GBM.

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Apr 21st, 10:25 AM Apr 21st, 10:40 AM

Effect of Ayurvedic Herbs on Glioblastoma Multiforme

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a stage IV astrocytoma, accounting for over 60% of all brain tumors in adults and a very poor prognosis of just 14-15 months. Despite numerous current treatment options, GBM recurs 90% of the time. With barriers in affordability and hesitance toward synthetic medicines, many people have turned to natural treatments for GBM. Last year, we tested the cytotoxicity of the U118 GBM cell line when treated with the common Ayurvedic herbs, hing, triphala, and coriander. With our initial testing, we found that the optimal concentration of triphala is 8 μl to induce cytotoxicity. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and lack of access to a lab, we shifted to conducting a meta-analysis of existing literature instead. We expanded our focus from three herbs, to a broader range of Ayurvedic herbs and their effects on not only Glioblastoma but on all types of cancers. For each herb, we have studied the structural compound and referenced existing studies on cancer cells to determine how these compounds would behave on GBM. Using these studies, we have also drawn conclusions on how the herbal compounds can be used as anti-inflammatory and antioxidative compounds to treat side effects of GBM.