Event Title

Status of Vitamin D in Children with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS)

Session Number

Project ID: BizIN 03

Advisor(s)

Dr. Dareen Siri, Midwest Allergy Sinus Asthma SC

Dr. Robert Kaufmann, Midwest Allergy Sinus Asthma SC

Discipline

Business

Start Date

20-4-2022 9:30 AM

End Date

20-4-2022 9:45 AM

Abstract

Numerous studies have indicated an association between vitamin D deficienc and the immune dysregulation and pathogenesis of autoimmunity. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children with PANS, an autoimmune disorder characterized by abrupt-onset neuropsychiatric symptoms. A retrospective chart review of 122 pediatric PANS patients at a single treatment center was performed. Data collected included 25-hydroxy vitamin D level, age, gender, and age of diagnosis. Vitamin D status was categorized as deficient (0-/ml), insufficient

(20-/ml) and sufficient (30-100 ng/ml). Patients were also stratified into two age groups; child (old) and adolescent (12-17 years old) and two gender groups; male and female. 8% of patients were categorized as deficient, 24% were insufficient, and 68% were sufficient. The odds ratio of vitamin D deficiency was 0.843505 [95% confidence interval (CI): -2.91 to 4.59] in PANS patients, when compared to deficiency, insufficiency, and sufficiency rates in the general US pediatric population. Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for PANS in children. Supplementation

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Apr 20th, 9:30 AM Apr 20th, 9:45 AM

Status of Vitamin D in Children with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS)

Numerous studies have indicated an association between vitamin D deficienc and the immune dysregulation and pathogenesis of autoimmunity. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children with PANS, an autoimmune disorder characterized by abrupt-onset neuropsychiatric symptoms. A retrospective chart review of 122 pediatric PANS patients at a single treatment center was performed. Data collected included 25-hydroxy vitamin D level, age, gender, and age of diagnosis. Vitamin D status was categorized as deficient (0-/ml), insufficient

(20-/ml) and sufficient (30-100 ng/ml). Patients were also stratified into two age groups; child (old) and adolescent (12-17 years old) and two gender groups; male and female. 8% of patients were categorized as deficient, 24% were insufficient, and 68% were sufficient. The odds ratio of vitamin D deficiency was 0.843505 [95% confidence interval (CI): -2.91 to 4.59] in PANS patients, when compared to deficiency, insufficiency, and sufficiency rates in the general US pediatric population. Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for PANS in children. Supplementation