EnACT

Title

Access to Menstrual Products for Women in Prisons

Document Type

Presentation

Type

EnACT

Start Date

27-4-2022 9:30 AM

End Date

27-4-2022 9:50 AM

Abstract

The United Nations' Bangkok Rules, which establish worldwide standards for the treatment of women in prison, specify that denying convicts access to menstrual hygiene products is "inhuman or degrading treatment," which is a violation of their human rights. This aligns with the United Nations SDG Goal 5, which is Gender Equality. Gender Equality implies a “peaceful, prosperous, sustainable world”, along with being a fundamental right. When it comes to menstruation in prisons, availability of menstruation products is extremely low, only 13 states have laws that require prisons to provide menstruation products for women. In York Correctional Institution, only ten pads are allowed per week, and while pads are provided, that is not always enough because pads are often used for other purposes, like cleaning. At another institution, Rose M. Singer Center, Betty Ann Whaley claimed that during her time spent at the center, pads were available “seven out of ten times,” and tampons even less available. Each of these situations do not follow the Bangkok Rules, they both limit the amount of menstrual products that are available to people. Each situation violates fundamental rights, which leads us to propose a solution to this problem.

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Apr 27th, 9:30 AM Apr 27th, 9:50 AM

Access to Menstrual Products for Women in Prisons

The United Nations' Bangkok Rules, which establish worldwide standards for the treatment of women in prison, specify that denying convicts access to menstrual hygiene products is "inhuman or degrading treatment," which is a violation of their human rights. This aligns with the United Nations SDG Goal 5, which is Gender Equality. Gender Equality implies a “peaceful, prosperous, sustainable world”, along with being a fundamental right. When it comes to menstruation in prisons, availability of menstruation products is extremely low, only 13 states have laws that require prisons to provide menstruation products for women. In York Correctional Institution, only ten pads are allowed per week, and while pads are provided, that is not always enough because pads are often used for other purposes, like cleaning. At another institution, Rose M. Singer Center, Betty Ann Whaley claimed that during her time spent at the center, pads were available “seven out of ten times,” and tampons even less available. Each of these situations do not follow the Bangkok Rules, they both limit the amount of menstrual products that are available to people. Each situation violates fundamental rights, which leads us to propose a solution to this problem.