Event Title

Variations on the Phenyl Groups of Bis-4-(N-carbazolyl)phenylphosphine Oxide for Host Layer of Blue Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

Session Number

E08

Advisor(s)

John Thurmond, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Location

A-119

Start Date

28-4-2016 9:50 AM

End Date

28-4-2016 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Chemistry

Abstract

Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) are more efficient versions of the common Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs), but are difficult to mass produce. Another problem with OLEDs is that blue OLEDs are not as efficient as other colors, making them unreliable. One way to combat this issue is through the use of host layers in these devices to increase the efficiency of the transfer of electron to electron holes. Finding such a host layer for blue OLEDs would cause more consistency, reliability, and efficiency in blue OLEDs, making OLEDs in general more accessible and usable for commercial and industrial purposes. We synthesized the base structure of the host layer using a vacuum to control pressure and purified between steps using column chromatography, nitrogen flushing, and gravity filtration. Once the base layer was synthesized, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and 3,5- diphenylbenzoic acid were added as new groups to replace the phenyl in the original bis-4-(N-carbazolyl)phenylphosphine oxide. These host layers will be tested against one another for efficiency. As of yet, no testing of efficiency has been conducted. Results will be presented at IMSALoquium.


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Apr 28th, 9:50 AM Apr 28th, 10:15 AM

Variations on the Phenyl Groups of Bis-4-(N-carbazolyl)phenylphosphine Oxide for Host Layer of Blue Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

A-119

Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) are more efficient versions of the common Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs), but are difficult to mass produce. Another problem with OLEDs is that blue OLEDs are not as efficient as other colors, making them unreliable. One way to combat this issue is through the use of host layers in these devices to increase the efficiency of the transfer of electron to electron holes. Finding such a host layer for blue OLEDs would cause more consistency, reliability, and efficiency in blue OLEDs, making OLEDs in general more accessible and usable for commercial and industrial purposes. We synthesized the base structure of the host layer using a vacuum to control pressure and purified between steps using column chromatography, nitrogen flushing, and gravity filtration. Once the base layer was synthesized, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and 3,5- diphenylbenzoic acid were added as new groups to replace the phenyl in the original bis-4-(N-carbazolyl)phenylphosphine oxide. These host layers will be tested against one another for efficiency. As of yet, no testing of efficiency has been conducted. Results will be presented at IMSALoquium.