Event Title

Session 1J: Search for Supersymmetry using the T1bbbb signal in the CMS experiment at the LHC

Session Number

Session 1J: 2nd Presentation

Advisor(s)

Dr. Richard Cavanaugh, Fermilab

Location

Room A121

Start Date

26-4-2018 9:40 AM

End Date

26-4-2018 10:25 AM

Abstract

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle detector that is being used to search for supersymmetric particles. The top quark is one of the most important particles in the search for Supersymmetry, and it and its supersymmetric partner, the stop particle, are highly sought after at CMS, as the stop particle is predicted to be the lightest of the supersymmetric particles and thus the easiest to find at the 7 TeV LHC. The T1bbbb signal was studied using data collected at CMS, and based on results will either be included in the overall search or will be used to eliminate from consideration any events of the sort. Two signal points were studied, one with a low delta m and one with a high delta m with regards to the gluino and neutralino produced. For both, cuts were applied on leptonic tracks, and on measured quantities such as missing ET, HT, and MTB, to remove mis-tagged events.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 9:40 AM Apr 26th, 10:25 AM

Session 1J: Search for Supersymmetry using the T1bbbb signal in the CMS experiment at the LHC

Room A121

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle detector that is being used to search for supersymmetric particles. The top quark is one of the most important particles in the search for Supersymmetry, and it and its supersymmetric partner, the stop particle, are highly sought after at CMS, as the stop particle is predicted to be the lightest of the supersymmetric particles and thus the easiest to find at the 7 TeV LHC. The T1bbbb signal was studied using data collected at CMS, and based on results will either be included in the overall search or will be used to eliminate from consideration any events of the sort. Two signal points were studied, one with a low delta m and one with a high delta m with regards to the gluino and neutralino produced. For both, cuts were applied on leptonic tracks, and on measured quantities such as missing ET, HT, and MTB, to remove mis-tagged events.