Event Title

Effect of Obesity on the Wound Healing Process

Advisor(s)

Irena Levitan, University of Illinois at Chicago

Yedida Bogachkov, University of Illinois at Chicago

Location

Room A117

Start Date

26-4-2019 10:25 AM

End Date

26-4-2019 10:40 AM

Abstract

Obesity is a common health condition where there is an excess and often dangerously high amount of fat in the body, measured by a Body Mass Index (BMI) above 30.0. We hypothesized that obesity may have a significant negative impact of the process of wound healing, the process of wound closure by the formation of new tissue. This hypothesis is based on recent studies in our lab showing that elevation of blood cholesterol in genetically modified mice results in a delayed wound closure and delayed angiogenesis. Our current study investigates how diet-inflicted obesity alone affects the wound healing process. The study compares wild type mice (B6/C57 background) that were fed either a normal chow diet or a high-fat diet. After 24 weeks on diet, wounds were inflicted via skin punch biopsies on the dorsal side of the mice and the area of the wound was measured over the course of ten days. Our results show, however, that there was no noticeable difference in wound closure between the normal and obese mice. These results suggest that in contrast to hypercholesterolemia, obesity alone does not have significant negative effect on wound healing in a mouse model of skin wounds.

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Apr 26th, 10:25 AM Apr 26th, 10:40 AM

Effect of Obesity on the Wound Healing Process

Room A117

Obesity is a common health condition where there is an excess and often dangerously high amount of fat in the body, measured by a Body Mass Index (BMI) above 30.0. We hypothesized that obesity may have a significant negative impact of the process of wound healing, the process of wound closure by the formation of new tissue. This hypothesis is based on recent studies in our lab showing that elevation of blood cholesterol in genetically modified mice results in a delayed wound closure and delayed angiogenesis. Our current study investigates how diet-inflicted obesity alone affects the wound healing process. The study compares wild type mice (B6/C57 background) that were fed either a normal chow diet or a high-fat diet. After 24 weeks on diet, wounds were inflicted via skin punch biopsies on the dorsal side of the mice and the area of the wound was measured over the course of ten days. Our results show, however, that there was no noticeable difference in wound closure between the normal and obese mice. These results suggest that in contrast to hypercholesterolemia, obesity alone does not have significant negative effect on wound healing in a mouse model of skin wounds.